Talking about divorce and keeping one’s dignity

On Behalf of | Nov 28, 2021 | Divorce

When people are dealing with a divorce and juggling their responsibilities at work, it may feel impossible to keep the two separated. However, allowing their personal circumstances to leak into their professional life may eventually cause embarrassment and regret.

When people choose to address their divorce appropriately, they can better maintain professionalism and dignity.

Prioritize privacy

Privacy allows divorcing couples to focus on negotiating a settlement without the pressure of everyone’s input. Oversharing information can create uncomfortable circumstances and cause embarrassment for everyone. According to Psychology Today, one way people can prevent oversharing is with a divorce elevator speech.

People can determine which information they want to share and articulate a brief description of their circumstances. People can practice delivering their speech so if the topic of divorce comes up in conversation, they feel ready to provide a dignified response.

Stay socially aware

It is one thing for people to behave professionally at work. However, if their personal conduct contradicts their behavior at work, the outcome could have costly consequences. According to Fast Company, if people have coworkers as friends on social media, they should pay particular attention to the information they choose to share. Similarly, if people choose to socialize with coworkers outside of work, they should make sure their conduct remains appropriate and respectful.

Divorce can cause a lot of emotions and uncertainty. While these feelings have validity, people will benefit more from sharing their feelings in a controlled environment such as therapy or in the presence of supportive family members. An attorney can help people identify which information they can reasonably share and which information is best kept private. Maintaining professionalism at work can help people to avoid embarrassment and that often results from oversharing personal information.

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